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to talk about today is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1846 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title dream to is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from the thinnest i've come across back in everything he did then in his career and this number as he writes frankly about experiences he's had, the good in the bad and it makes for good reading. but one thing that grant spent some time together talking about in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. grant said at the time, i do not think there is a more wicked words and outraged by the united states and mexico. so at the time when as a youngster, only he had not wrote urging us to resign and grant during the time that the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. i found this a really moving quotes so he took it from a typo. the fact is grant was not allowed in thinking the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing i talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war, which is not about word by any means from being really t
national defense, history and geography of, and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon pages history of the estates is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart today to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's history of the modern world," which in this case is going to be from 1898 to just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. larry? [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and it's one that which my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great passions of liberty and a swelling sea of collectivism. you probably do know that you are getting somebody here that was a previous rock drummer. this later became significant in learning, as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along my expenses in the rock band were pretty informative. i, student i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing and start. when mike allen and i wrote "a patriot's history of the united states"
of what they sell and produce is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible and robust as quickly as possible because it means they'll continue to ask for. as much as they try to move from an export economy to a domestic consumption-based economy, and the reality is the more americans were coming for money they have in the pocket and the more they'll be shopping in stores. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more they china will export and that means jobs for the chinese people. >> how much are they actually worried about the united states and how much time and attention are they paying to overdo it and enough relationship versus there are internal issues? >> i think the united states is incredibly important in china and they recognize that not only did their part to always ambassador locke has just described, but in another way i think you could say it's more psychological. it's a 150 year history where china has been trying to chain itself up into big power status. it's not there is very close to being there. get their just lingeri
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
thoughts on the interpretation of the u.s. constitution and what the author means by up to his passages. mr. amar posits the constitution can be understood by the original text alone or historical precedent. akhil reed amar discusses his book with supreme court justice clarence thomas of the national air cried -- archives here in washington. this is about 20 minutes. >> good evening. i'm the archivist of the united states and is a pleasure to welcome you to the national archives in theater this evening. a special welcome to our friends at c-span and the other media outlets who are with us tonight. we have a lot of special guests in the audience today but i want to single out a special welcome to senator mike reed who is a good friend of the national archives, senator reed from utah. [applause] who himself clerked for a future supreme court justice, judge alito when he was at the u.s. court of appeals on the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the united states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that the national archives is presenting this month in celebration
for a future supreme court justice, judge alito when he was at the u.s. court of appeals on the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the united states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that the national archives is presenting this month in celebration of the founding document, signed in philadelphia on september 17, 1787. tonight we are honored to welcome two distinguished guests to explore the past, present and future of united states constitution. our partners for tonight's program in honor of those of the constitution are the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thanks for the opportunity to collaborate with you this evening. the declaration of independence was long heralded as the icon of our independence to nationhood. the constitution did not get as much attention. its declarations and it's for parchment pages to the declaration single sheets to cheer most casual readers. the lack of celebration however works to its advantage. over the years, the declaration was exposed to sunlight, dust and smoke but the constitution was never
. but internally you have tribal rivalries that have to be played out or sometimes a u.s. corporation in one city with one group of people creates resentment among and other. there want to rebuild neighborhoods, but they don't want to be seen as lackeys of the americans. gives you a strange dynamic and gives you insight into the impact that history has been to the support of the world that is used to congress for thousands of years. it been able to create a relationship and hedge their bets. apart from the human tragedies, your heart breaks when you read about someone he just had a baby a few days earlier, spoke to his wife before he went on a mission and nine helicopter crash. your heart breaks and reminds you of the human cost and also reminds you of the logistical challenge. >> did this book makes you regret operation afghanistan? >> no. i just think it reminds us of the challenges of the. the end of the day after ana says it -- afghanistan is important. you don't want to create a safe haven for people to the be able to come back and reconstitute, but it's also about pakistan. to have an unsta
. albany known as one of the most populous cities in the u.s. in 1810 is home to several institutions of higher living -- learning including the university of albany, stage and president of new york, a albany law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s., anti-albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we are in the university of albany's department of special collections and archives, and what are the main depositor on campus for collecting archival records, historical records, primary sources that are used by students, teachers, scholars, journalists and many other folks. >> a national death penalty archive was started here at the university of albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the archivist it ended special collections and archives and faculty members of the school. there's no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital pu
in 1876 and that was u.s. versus cruickshank, which rose out of the horrible massacre, one of the worst in the reconstruction. , with the whole war, blacks had tried to defend themselves in louisiana and were attacked by white crowds and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers on the grounds that they had deprived the blacks who were killed -- >> host: mna type issue. >> guest: didn't find that was the case. at that time we don't see any racial motivation at all to deprive blacks of their very specifically. in a kind of a side, the ruling said that the right to keep and bear arms in the second amendment was not a right granted by the constitution. it was a preexisting right. so if there is any application that courts later extended that if it applied to anybody, who is the federal government. so it's a limitation on federal governments to tell certain classes. >> host: that's how most of the bill of rights is interpreted. but it only applied to the federal government unless specifically incorporated to the states. >> we didn't get on the second amendment until 2010 f
. >> tell me a little bit more about your research on what the u.s. force presence and the cocoalition force presence might need to be after 2014 and what other, in addition to forces, what other resources do you think that the afghan state will require. >> um -- >> talk about your paper. >> for my paper. as a war college student, aye got to produce -- i've got to produce some sort of research product. they're actually going to hold me accountable for enjoying a year at stanford, california. so my penance is to do some research, and it could be a lot of key strategic issues. what i came to two months ago driving across country with two dogs, two kids, cars, u-haul, trying to find a place to live was, you know, i'm really passionate about the future of afghanistan and pakistan. it matters. so let me do some research on. that lots of issues involved with that. but specifically, what are some of the course of action, if you will, for force structure and mission sets in afghanistan after the combat mission with nato and isaf ends in 2014. and by strange coincidence, our secretary this morning, s
12 years until president ronald reagan, a knitted him as an associate justice of the u.s. supreme court. he took his current seat in 1988. in nominating justice kennedy to the supreme court in 1987, president ronald reagan remarked that his career was a judge in the u.s. court of appeals for the ninth circuit as a constitutional law professor and in private practice was marked by the devotion to the simple straightforward principle but we are a government of law and not of men. during the more than three decades on the bench, justice kennedy has played an interpol role in the consideration and the decision of some of the most significant cases and serious constitutional alleges in the nation's history. he's been a staunch defender of the first amendment rights, individual liberty against government intrusion and federalism. these are qualities of the constitutional series and we are honored to have the justice. heritage to provide this evening's lecture. please join me in welcoming the honorable anthony kennedy. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. good afterno
and broke off. their interpretation of the news was critical for the u.s. government. likewise, time and newsweek. i mean, you now have -- pardon me. you now have many more news broadcasts and we have the internet. so if we could just get rid of the new york times, the problem would be about 25 percent salt. i actually am serious about that because of its influence on media elites throughout the country who look at it to determine how to understand the world. >> please join and then taking the panelists. [applause] >> every weekend book tv offers 48 hours of programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. watch it here on c-span2. >> now from a conference on the 60th anniversary of the publication of whitaker chambers witness, a panel entitled without anti communism what defines conservatives to that. it's about an hour. >> so could not help remember someone was talking about the adulation which the world health i don't know if everyone here is aware. in august educational institution not too far from here, a bard college, there is actually in alger humanities. my colleague the
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
in a ruling in 1876. that was u.s. versus cookshank, which arose out of a horrible massacre. one of the worst in the reconstruction period, where a whole -- hundreds or more, blacks, had tried to defend themselves in louisiana, and were attacked by a white crowd, and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers. on the grounds they had deprived the blacks who were killed of their right -- >> amend. >> guest: -- the supreme court didn't find that was the case. it said at that time we don't see there was any racial motivation at all here to deprive blacks of their rights specifically, and in a kind of aside, the ruling said that the right to keep and bear arms in the second amendment was not a right granted by the constitution. it was a preexisting right. and so if there was any application, courts alert extended from that to say if it was depriving anybody, it was the federal government. so i was a limitation on the federal government. >> host: that's how most of the bill of rights is interpreted by the courts. only applied the federal government unless it was specifically inco
william skinner in the middle of the 20th century on the his of some of the most influential people on u.s. soil, and they had the larger readership in the country second only to the bible. i mentioned earlier that one of the questions that writers are asked is so what's your book about. shortly thereafter they will ask how'd you find your story. and how i came upon the story had to do with my family. william skinner was my great, great grandfather. here is an image of him around the age of 30. he has just lost his first wife, nancy. he's a widower in this photograph with his two young daughters. and he'd also just opened his silk mill in the area that would become known as skinnerville. i find this photograph haunting. the intensity in his eyes just burns, just sears you. he's so driven, he's so ambitious. and yet tenderly clutching his daughters. this is a photograph of his first wife, nancy warner, and she died shortly after the death of their second daughter, nina. skinner married again to a woman named sarah elizabeth allen, she was known as lizzie, and she is the woman after whom i a
. please. >> from south totingham, sir we look up in disgunfight and disbelief at discrimination. the u.s. after the civil war, racism. britain in the 180000s, sexism. it wasn't until someone had the initiative to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet movement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage in order to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people are below their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate because we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart
fall. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book, and one of the authors u.s. be at the book festival is brooke stoddard. here is his book, "world in the balance: the perilous months of june-october 1940". brooke stoddard, world war ii started about six months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to compl
. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as, indeed, if it becomes necessary i will appeal to government back benches to afford a fair hearing to the shadow chancellor. that's how it should be. the chancellor. >> mr. speaker, britain is on the right track, and turning back now would be a disaster. we have much more to do. the deficit has fallen by a q
of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water and dirt is not a pollutant. we have to redef
premier fighting units among the best in u.s. history. the soldiers of the 442nd regimental combat team served with such distinction that 21 of them were awarded the medal of honor. no other regiment in history has this distinction given size and length of service. her legacy as a drumbeat of loyalty, of kurds, honor, dedication and sacrifice. dan inouye served as an infantryman, and listing in 1943 at age 18. within a year he was promoted to sergeant. his performance of combat lead to a battlefield commission as second lieutenant in 1944, age 20. less than a year later, while leading his platoon on an attack on enemy machine-gun positions, he was grievously wounded and permanently disabled. his actions on 21 april 1945 content so, italy with a retired example of strength, stamina, courage and determination. for which he received one of the 21 idols of honor awarded to soldiers. dan inouye another veterans return to war, having achieved something monumental, something as we say larger than themselves. and they sensed they had earned the right to take larger roles in their communities. t
of independence that we saw yesterday in the presentation and the u.s. flag that flew over fort mchenry. she will kill me for putting it this way, but prepare yourself for book history csi. [applause] >> it has been such an amazing privilege of the last two days to build the knowledge that has been brought together at the summit. it was discussed yesterday and seemed to be a continuing theme throughout that the resources of knowledge that leads to new christians, it can't be just information. it must be knowledge. in the preservation, in short of an interrupted exit either an original or reformulated form. very nicely ties in with the use of new technology and how we actually access that content. spectral imaging and other non invasive technologies we can access not visible information and change the information into content knowledge from our book. we can create accurate digital rendering of the intermission and make it more accessible in the digital object. the find it interesting because if we did not have the original material we could not use the new technology to pull up the informatio
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)